3D SHUTTER

3D SHUTTER - MOTORISED ROLLER BLINDS - WHITE QUEEN CANOPY BED.

ROMAN SHADES FOR BAY WINDOWS - FOR BAY WINDOWS


Roman Shades For Bay Windows - Pinch Pleated Patio Drapes



Roman Shades For Bay Windows





roman shades for bay windows














roman shades for bay windows - The Sims




The Sims 3: Barnacle Bay [Download Code]


The Sims 3: Barnacle Bay [Download Code]



Live the island life in Barnacle Bay! Your Sims will enjoy stunning beaches, parks, campgrounds, and a curiously modern downtown. Whether they’re meeting new Sims or uncovering the community’s secrets, life at the seaside is full of surprises! A New World Awaits-Escape to Barnacle Bay today!

An island nestled in the Simuyan Sea, Barnacle Bay is a vibrant vacation getaway with stunning beaches, campgrounds, parks, and a curiously modern downtown. First settled by pirates, fisherman, and artists - the world's inhabitants now enjoy relaxing at Smuggler's Beach and letting loose at The Wanderer's Watering Hole. Will Your trip be a vacation or a staycation?
The Sims 3: Barnacle Bay
Meet new Sims!
Meet new Sims!
Explore new areas
Explore new areas
18 all-new exclusive items
18 all-new exclusive items
Synopsis
Live the island life in Barnacle Bay! Your Sims will enjoy stunning beaches, parks, campgrounds, and a curiously modern downtown. Whether they’re meeting new Sims or uncovering the community’s secrets, life at the seaside is full of surprises! A New World Awaits-Escape to Barnacle Bay today!
Key Features:
Meet new Sims, discover the world's secrets, and unwind at Barnacle Beach
Enjoy 18 all-new exclusive objects and clothing only available in Barnacle Bay
In Barnacle Bay - Having lunch on a Pirate Ship is only part of the to-do list:
Grab a bite to eat at Hogan's Deep Sea Diner before fishing at Ophelia's Fishing Hole
Explore the mystery hidden in Pirate's Hideaway or meet new Sims at The Wanderer's Watering Hole
Discover the mysterious Barnacle Bay lore by exploring the abandoned piers of Founder's Beach and the relics found within the Goldbeard Galleon Gallery
Barnacle Bay includes 18 all-new exclusive items!










81% (15)





107-109 Riverside Drive House




107-109 Riverside Drive House





Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The 107-109 Riverside Drive House, originally designed by well-known architect and developer Clarence F. True, was built on speculation in 1898- 99 as one house of a picturesque group of six houses on the southeast corner of Riverside Drive and West 83rd Street. Today the 107-109 Riverside Drive House is architecturally significant and as one of the five extant houses in this group represents the first period of development on Riverside Drive. True designed several hundred houses, primarily in groups, on the Upper West Side in the years between 1890 and 1901, and was largely responsible for promoting the development and establishing the character of lower Riverside Drive. The houses in the group at Riverside and West 83rd Street were designed in True's signature "Elizabethan Revival" style based on French and English Renaissance prototypes and built by True's development firm, the Riverside Building Company; they are the northernmost of True's designs built along the Drive. The trapezoid-shaped 107-109 Riverside Drive House is prominently located on the corner and has wide facades of over forty feet; its design is characterized by such picturesque elements as contrasting orange Roman ironspot brick and Ihnestone facing, an elaborate entrance with a low stoop, round-arched and rectangular windows, keyed surrounds, decorative ironwork, prominent chimneys, crenellation, and a tile roof. This house was originally designed with a three-quarter-round comer tower and projecting three-sided bays on both sides, but these features facing Riverside Drive (along with those of the adjacent houses) became the focus of an interesting legal controversy several years after construction. As the result of a lawsuit brought by an adjacent property owner, the court ruled in 1903 that no one had the authority to place permanent encroachments onto public thoroughfares, and the owners of the houses in the True group facing onto Riverside Drive were thus ordered to remove the projections. In 1911 the facades were removed and rebuilt to follow the diagonal of the Riverside Drive property lines. No. 107-109 (owned by Charles Austin Bates, a successful businessman) was partially rebuilt with the original materials by the firm of Tracy, Swartwout & Litchfield; the West 83rd Street facade apparently was not subject to the lawsuit as it does not face the Drive and remains unaltered. As seen today, although the 107-109 Riverside Drive House reflects the work of two architectural firms, it basically remains a successfully modified version of the original picturesque Elizabethan Revival design.

The Development of Riverside Drive

The Upper West Side, known as Bloomingdale prior to its urbanization, remained largely undeveloped until the 1880s. In the early eighteenth century, Bloomingdale Road (later renamed the Boulevard and finally Broadway in 1898) was opened through rural Bloomingdale and provided the northern route out of the city which was then concentrated at the southern tip of Manhattan. The Upper West Side was included in the Randel Survey of 1811 (known as the Commissioners' Map) which established a uniform grid of avenues and cross streets in Manhattan as far north as 155th Street, although years elapsed before streets on the Upper West Side were actually laid out, some as late as the 1870s and 1880s, and the land was subdivided into building lots. Improved public transportation to the area contributed to the growth and sustained development of the Upper West Side, particularly the completion in 1879 of the Elevated Railway on Ninth Avenue (renamed Columbus Avenue in 1890).

The biggest boost to the development of the West End (the area west of Broadway), however, was the creation of Riverside Drive and Park (a designated New York City Scenic Landmark). The presence of the Park and Drive was an important factor in making this area desirable for high-quality residential development. In 1865 the first proposal for converting the land on the Upper West Side along the eastern shore of the Hudson River into an ornamental park had been presented by Park Commissioner William R. Martin. The purchase of the park site and initial plans were approved in 1866. The drive, as proposed at this time, was to be a straight 100-foot wide road; however, this plan was impractical due to the existing topography. Hired by the Commissioners in 1873, Frederick law Olmsted (1822-1903), already distinguished by his collaboration with Calvert Vaux (1824-1895) in the successful design for Central Park, proposed an alternate scheme. Olmsted's design for Riverside Park and Drive took into consideration the pre-existing topography, landscape possibilities, and views, resulting in a park and drive that would be amenable for horses and pleasure driving, would provide shaded walks for pedestrians, and would also allow easy access to and scenic vistas from th











107-109 Riverside Drive House




107-109 Riverside Drive House





Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The 107-109 Riverside Drive House, originally designed by well-known architect and developer Clarence F. True, was built on speculation in 1898- 99 as one house of a picturesque group of six houses on the southeast corner of Riverside Drive and West 83rd Street. Today the 107-109 Riverside Drive House is architecturally significant and as one of the five extant houses in this group represents the first period of development on Riverside Drive. True designed several hundred houses, primarily in groups, on the Upper West Side in the years between 1890 and 1901, and was largely responsible for promoting the development and establishing the character of lower Riverside Drive. The houses in the group at Riverside and West 83rd Street were designed in True's signature "Elizabethan Revival" style based on French and English Renaissance prototypes and built by True's development firm, the Riverside Building Company; they are the northernmost of True's designs built along the Drive. The trapezoid-shaped 107-109 Riverside Drive House is prominently located on the corner and has wide facades of over forty feet; its design is characterized by such picturesque elements as contrasting orange Roman ironspot brick and Ihnestone facing, an elaborate entrance with a low stoop, round-arched and rectangular windows, keyed surrounds, decorative ironwork, prominent chimneys, crenellation, and a tile roof. This house was originally designed with a three-quarter-round comer tower and projecting three-sided bays on both sides, but these features facing Riverside Drive (along with those of the adjacent houses) became the focus of an interesting legal controversy several years after construction. As the result of a lawsuit brought by an adjacent property owner, the court ruled in 1903 that no one had the authority to place permanent encroachments onto public thoroughfares, and the owners of the houses in the True group facing onto Riverside Drive were thus ordered to remove the projections. In 1911 the facades were removed and rebuilt to follow the diagonal of the Riverside Drive property lines. No. 107-109 (owned by Charles Austin Bates, a successful businessman) was partially rebuilt with the original materials by the firm of Tracy, Swartwout & Litchfield; the West 83rd Street facade apparently was not subject to the lawsuit as it does not face the Drive and remains unaltered. As seen today, although the 107-109 Riverside Drive House reflects the work of two architectural firms, it basically remains a successfully modified version of the original picturesque Elizabethan Revival design.

The Development of Riverside Drive

The Upper West Side, known as Bloomingdale prior to its urbanization, remained largely undeveloped until the 1880s. In the early eighteenth century, Bloomingdale Road (later renamed the Boulevard and finally Broadway in 1898) was opened through rural Bloomingdale and provided the northern route out of the city which was then concentrated at the southern tip of Manhattan. The Upper West Side was included in the Randel Survey of 1811 (known as the Commissioners' Map) which established a uniform grid of avenues and cross streets in Manhattan as far north as 155th Street, although years elapsed before streets on the Upper West Side were actually laid out, some as late as the 1870s and 1880s, and the land was subdivided into building lots. Improved public transportation to the area contributed to the growth and sustained development of the Upper West Side, particularly the completion in 1879 of the Elevated Railway on Ninth Avenue (renamed Columbus Avenue in 1890).

The biggest boost to the development of the West End (the area west of Broadway), however, was the creation of Riverside Drive and Park (a designated New York City Scenic Landmark). The presence of the Park and Drive was an important factor in making this area desirable for high-quality residential development. In 1865 the first proposal for converting the land on the Upper West Side along the eastern shore of the Hudson River into an ornamental park had been presented by Park Commissioner William R. Martin. The purchase of the park site and initial plans were approved in 1866. The drive, as proposed at this time, was to be a straight 100-foot wide road; however, this plan was impractical due to the existing topography. Hired by the Commissioners in 1873, Frederick law Olmsted (1822-1903), already distinguished by his collaboration with Calvert Vaux (1824-1895) in the successful design for Central Park, proposed an alternate scheme. Olmsted's design for Riverside Park and Drive took into consideration the pre-existing topography, landscape possibilities, and views, resulting in a park and drive that would be amenable for horses and pleasure driving, would provide shaded walks for pedestrians, and would also allow easy access to and scenic vistas from the real estate bordering









roman shades for bay windows







Related topics:

d90 rolling shutter fix

bali roman blinds

outdoor patio shades

playground shade

uv shade cloth

drapery hardware corner

awning fabric material

stand alone awning



  1. (火) 12:37:36|
  2. Category: None
  3. | Trackbacks:0
  4. | Comments:0
<<QUEEN CANOPY BED - QUEEN CANOPY | HOME | SHELTER LOGIC SHADE LOGIC QUICK CLAMP CANOPY : LOGIC QUICK C>>

Comments

Post a comment


Only the blog author may view the comment.

Trackbacks

Trackbacks URL
http://3dshutteruf.blog.fc2.com/tb.php/5-58db9b8e
Use trackback on this entry.